Ahwatukee Realty & Property Management Inc

How to Find a Great Local Veterinarian

by Ahwatukee Realty & Property Management Inc 09/27/2020

Photo by David Mark via Pixabay

Picking the right veterinarian for your pets matters. It will put you at ease every time they need a healing touch. Whether you're new in town, or your pet has a specific issue you'd like carefully tended, here's how to find a vet who will offer you a high standard of care.

Finding the Best Vet in Town: Where to Start

You can start with a simple search: "veterinarian near me." Then, take a look at each website that comes up on the first page of search results. Check out the vets' biographies. Do they belong to the American Veterinary Medical Association? What about your state's or region's veterinary medical association? These are key credentials.

Now, talk with your neighbors who take a keen interest in their pets' well-being. They will be able to give you recommendations. Don't just ask your neighbor which office they use. Ask which of the practice's vets they couldn't do without!

Confirming What You Learn: Supplementing Your Pick With an Online Search

The two strategies above, combined, will start a solid, well-informed search.

Round your strategy out by going onto the online review sites (such as Yelp or Google), and confirm the opinion you have made.

Sure, some people use review sites to vent. But many clients use the sites to praise particular vets and their pets' experiences. And the negative reviews are likely to be answered in a polite, professional way by a good veterinary office.

Your Pet's First Visit: How You'll Know You've Found the Right Expert 

During your first appointment, consider all of these aspects good signs:

  • The place is clean. It looks busy, but not unmanageably hectic.
  • The office staff members are polite and understanding when answering calls.
  • Both the staff and the vet make you and your pet feel respected, and put you at ease. 
  • There is a caring protocol for pets' pain management. Neutering and spaying, for example, include pain relief medicine.

You'll want to know there are at least two vets on staff, to offer adequate coverage for absences. And the office should offer at least some weekend hours.

Changing Course: When the Time Comes to Switch Vet Practices

Do not be embarrassed about switching to a new vet if you develop concerns about your current practice. You might also just wish to go with another, highly recommended vet.

But do collect all the necessary information before you switch. Ask for full records pertaining to your pet. These might be handed to you on a disk, or sent directly to your new vet.

Best wishes settling in with the perfect vet to oversee the health of your best buddies for life.